"Access to Justice for China's Workers," NYU Labor and Employment Law News, Issue 13 (Winter 2017).

Who Will Represent China's Workers? Lawyers, Legal Aid, and the Enforcement of Labor Rights, U.S.-Asia Law Institute, NYU School of Law (Oct. 2016).

"Chinese Workers and the Legal System: Bridging the Gap in Representation," Made in China, Issue 3 (2016), pp. 15-18.

"United States," in Minawa Ebisui, Sean Cooney and Colin Fenwick, eds., Resolving Individual Labour Disputes: A Comparative Overview (International Labour Organisation, 2016).

“Legal Representation for New York’s Chinese Immigrant Workers,” in Samuel Estreicher and Joy Radice, eds., Beyond Elite Law: Access to Civil Justice in America, 563-80 (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

"Employees in China should be allowed to protest against work conditions without fear of reprisal," South China Morning Post (Apr. 19, 2016).

"中国不应视公民社会组织为威胁" [China should not view civil society groups as a threat ], FT 中文网 [Financial Times China Net], Jan. 11, 2016 (with Eli Friedman & Jerome A. Cohen).

“Cruel irony: China’s Communists are stamping out labor activism,” Washington Post, Jan. 3, 2016 (with Eli Friedman & Jerome A. Cohen).

"Roadmap for Myanmar's Labour Law Reform Process," commissioned by the International Labour Organization and presented at the Stakeholder Forum of the Initiative to Promote Fundamental Labor Rights Practices in Myanmar (May 18-19, 2015). [Executive Summary, Concept Paper, Appendices.] 

"China’s restrictions on barefoot lawyers could backfire, leading to more unrest,” South China Morning Post (Mar. 30, 2015).

Empty Judgments: The Wage Collection Crisis in New York (2015) (contributing author).

"Strike a balance," South China Morning Post (Feb. 26, 2015).  [Chinese version.]

"Memo on U.S. Employment Law," in Conference Materials: U.S.-Asia Law Institute Labor Law Workshop, Shanghai, China (June 2014). [English version; English and Chinese version.]

"Outline on State and Federal Employment-Related Retaliation Statutes" and "Appendix on Adverse Actions" prepared for National Employment Lawyers Association/NY Conference (Sept. 23, 2011) (co-author).

“EEOC Commissioners Review Regulations, Policies, Priorities.”  40 Labor & Employment Law 7 (Fall 2011). 

“Getting Paid: Solving the Labor Disputes of China’s Migrant Workers,” 26 Berkeley Journal of International Law 254 (2008). 

"The Debate Over Raising Chinese Labor Standards Goes International,” 1 Harvard Law & Policy Review (Online) (Apr. 2007). 

“Reforming the People’s Mediation System in Urban China," 35 Hong Kong Law Journal 715 (2005). 

中国城镇地区人民调解制度改革 [Reforming the People’s Mediation System in Urban China], 司法:纠纷解决与社会和谐 (第一辑) [Journal of Justice: Dispute Resolution and Social Harmony (Vol. 1)], 法律出版社 [Law Press – China] (2006) (Translated by Dai Xin). [Article Summary (Chinese)]

“Consensus from the Bottom Up? Assessing the Influence of the Sanctions Reform Processes” with Thomas J. Biersteker, Sue E. Eckert, and Peter Romaniuk, in Peter Wallensteen and Carina Staibano, eds., International Sanctions: Between Words and Wars in the Global System (Routledge, 2005).

“Sanctions and State Capacity: Towards a Framework for National Level Implementation,” with Thomas J. Biersteker, Sue E. Eckert, and Peter Romaniuk in Peter Wallensteen and Carina Staibano, eds., International Sanctions: Between Words and Wars in the Global System (Routledge, 2005).

“A Comparative Assessment of Saudi Arabia with other Countries of the Islamic World,” with Thomas J. Biersteker, Sue E. Eckert, Peter Romaniuk, Jesse Finkelstein and Elizabeth Goodfriend, Appendix C to Update on the Global Campaign Against Terrorist Financing: Second Report of an Independent Task Force on Terrorist Financing (New York, NY: Council on Foreign Relations, June 2004). 

Targeted Financial Sanctions: A Manual for Design and Implementation (Contributions from the Interlaken Process), with Thomas J. Biersteker, Sue E. Eckert, Natalie Reid and Peter Romaniuk (Watson Institute for International Studies, Providence, RI, 2001).